"At the age of five, Gayle Wheatley would paint in the studio next to her father. This early creative influence echoes across her paintings today. 'My favorite subjects back then included purple unicorns with manes of fire, and underwater worlds. To this day if you look closely, fragments of those early obsessions are still present in much of my work, in updated form of course!'

...Although she's a California native, Gayle has lived in Florence, Italy and Osaka, Japan, and her wanderlust has taken her to five continents, thirty countries, and over three-hundred cities. This international exploration has had a tremendous impact on her art and writing, keeping her invigorated and challenged.

...When she's not traveling, eating exotic delicacies, playing her pineapple ukulele, drawing space ninjas, or practicing the martial art of Jeet Kune Do, Gayle sets out on individual artistic missions. 'I've pushed boundaries with my creative goals,' she says. 'One year I challenged myself to paint 100 paintings in under a year. I reached my goal in just ten months and have been painting up a storm ever since.' She credits those months with spurring a ton of personal growth, as her ambitious painting schedule forced her to overcome many of her weaknesses and to explore her strengths as a painter."
—Excerpts from the Sock It To Me, Cool Girl of the Month Artist Interview

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW HERE DOWNLOAD THE FULL INTERVIEW HERE

"Gayle Wheatley is a well-known artist based in the Los Angeles area. She is supremely talented and works in an impressive array of media, including oil on canvas, illustration, and graphic design. Her work is displayed in numerous exhibitions and galleries around the world, and much of it has been snapped up by art collectors who lamentably discovered her before I did.

Gayle spent two years living in Japan, and I'm guessing that this is at least part of what has inspired her to use sushi imagery in her work. What interests me about Gayle's art is her uncanny ability to depict the connection between sushi and life.

Gayle has managed to use sushi to portray these undersea organisms as the vivacious, mysterious, beating-heart marvels that they are. Her vibrant, almost monstrous depictions of the animals "behind the sushi" strikes a chord with me. Salmon roe sport teeth, similar to those they would have developed had they been allowed to hatch and mature. A clutch of eels writhe and squirm against a nori yoke, struggling mightily to escape a hackneyed kabeyaki fate. Cold- or warm-blooded, exo- or endo-skeletal, shelled or scaled, pelagic or benthic… it makes no difference. Gayle's work ably demonstrates that all of the ocean's inhabitants merit our reverence, as does the amazingly complex ecosystem that they compose."
—Casson Trenor, SustainableSushi.net

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW HERE DOWNLOAD THE FULL INTERVIEW HERE